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Breastfeeding Dad
Yes, yes I know it’s not possible for men to breastfeed, regardless of how large our manboobs may have become, and regardless of how our little ones might have attempted to suckle from us in desperation (and man does it hurt when they hit their mark!)
Seriously though I am talking about what Dads can do when their partner is going through breastfeeding, how they can help and support them, and some things to watch out for.
During the pregnancy we both agreed that if it was possible we’d much prefer to breastfeed the baby, both for the natural goodness and protection that it gives but also for the closeness it would give mum and baby.
But as we know that doesn’t leave a lot for the dads to do!  We see the young one being guided to the boob and there seems to be very little else we can do – apparently staring is off-putting!
But there is actually quite a lot that us non-milk-producers can do to help!  Here are some of the things that I’ve discovered!
- Make them comfortable – There are a number of different positions that your partner might feel comfortable being in when feeding basically either lying down or sitting up.  Lying down is potentially the most comfortable but it can really help if you can place a number of pillows behind her so she has some wiggle room without concern of having to hold herself on her side.
Sitting up is similar, my partner needs a huge amount of pillows behind her, particularly if she is tired.
Breastfeeding is also very thirsty work so make sure that a full bottle of water is to hand, with the lid on loosely so it can be opened one-handed.  Also check any other things that she does to get comfy – my partner’s feet get very hot so if she is in bed she needs the covers off her feet.
- Be supportive – You think that the lack of non-stop sleep is bad on you?  You should thank your stars that you don’t also have to feed the little one in a particular position for what can be an hour+!  So be supportive of her, let her know that what she is doing is right, that she’s doing the best for him and that you’ll do what you can to help.  And if she decides to stop breastfeeding then be supportive again – if she feels she truly can’t continue then it’s best for both of them that
- Help with the winding – That boy needs to get the wind out, and to be part of the process and give mum a break – I’m the man who deals with the winding!  It’s a little thing but I think it makes a difference.
- Get other things done – I found it so satisfying to do the washing up at 3am….  Yes I am a weirdo, but it means I am using the time while he is getting fed to do something useful for everyone and not just seeming like a useless lunk snoring my head off while my partner glares at me as she feeds….
- Encourage getting support – There are lots of breastfeeding support groups out there – find out when they are, where they are and let your partner know.  They may not feel they need the support of other breastfeeding mums but the sharing can make a difference, just try to encourage them to give it a go.
I’ve only been a dad for 3 weeks so please let me know what you have learnt!

Yes, yes I know it’s not possible for men to breastfeed, regardless of how large our manboobs may have become, and regardless of how our little ones might have attempted to suckle from us in desperation (and man does it hurt when they hit their mark!)

Seriously though I am talking about what Dads can do when their partner is going through breastfeeding, how they can help and support them, and some things to watch out for.

During the pregnancy we both agreed that if it was possible we’d much prefer to breastfeed the baby, both for the natural goodness and protection that it gives but also for the closeness it would give mum and baby.

But as we know that doesn’t leave a lot for the dads to do!  We see the young one being guided to the boob and there seems to be very little else we can do – apparently staring is off-putting!

But there is actually quite a lot that us non-milk-producers can do to help!  Here are some of the things that I’ve discovered!

  • Make them comfortable – There are a number of different positions that your partner might feel comfortable being in when feeding basically either lying down or sitting up.  Lying down is potentially the most comfortable but it can really help if you can place a number of pillows behind her so she has some wiggle room without concern of having to hold herself on her side.Sitting up is similar, my partner needs a huge amount of pillows behind her, particularly if she is tired.Breastfeeding is also very thirsty work so make sure that a full bottle of water is to hand, with the lid on loosely so it can be opened one-handed.  Also check any other things that she does to get comfy – my partner’s feet get very hot so if she is in bed she needs the covers off her feet.
  • Be supportive – You think that the lack of non-stop sleep is bad on you?  You should thank your stars that you don’t also have to feed the little one in a particular position for what can be an hour+!  So be supportive of her, let her know that what she is doing is right, that she’s doing the best for him and that you’ll do what you can to help.  And if she decides to stop breastfeeding then be supportive again – if she feels she truly can’t continue then it’s best for both of them that
  • Help with the winding – That boy needs to get the wind out, and to be part of the process and give mum a break – I’m the man who deals with the winding!  It’s a little thing but I think it makes a difference.
  • Get other things done – I found it so satisfying to do the washing up at 3am….  Yes I am a weirdo, but it means I am using the time while he is getting fed to do something useful for everyone and not just seeming like a useless lunk snoring my head off while my partner glares at me as she feeds….
  • Encourage getting support – There are lots of breastfeeding support groups out there – find out when they are, where they are and let your partner know.  They may not feel they need the support of other breastfeeding mums but the sharing can make a difference, just try to encourage them to give it a go.

I’ve only been a dad for 3 weeks so please let me know what you have learnt in the comments section!

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