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Buggies/Prams/PushChairs!
Choosing how you are going to push your little one around really must be up there with choosing a car in terms of choice and complexity!
There are so many aspects to keep in mind when choosing your “travel system” as many of these are now grandly described.
After so much time looking at the different options in stores, pushing them around, getting the salesperson to show me how they fold, etc. I feel I can give a few hints and tips about what to look out for when you are doing your own pram search.
——
Weight – You will be amazed at how heavy these things can be – they may look all sleek and light but that is generally only for the ones that are for older children that don’t need as much support.  I highly recommend that you get them and try to lift them yourself, you may be surprised.  Keep in mind that you then need to add the weight of a baby, and all of their additional paraphernalia!
Easy of Folding – Because of the complexity of these systems they also have equally complex ways of folding down.  And this is crucial both when you are at home collapsing it so that you can get into the rest of your house, but also if you need to fold them down when travelling (putting them in a boot, closing down for train or bus, etc.)
Length of use – The price of the system has to be balanced against how long it is going to be useful for – you can get some expensive systems that cost a fortune and aren’t useful when baby becomes a toddler.  And have a think about if you plan to have babies in quick succession – some buggies come with the ability to expand to hold two babies/toddlers.
Maneuverability – Again this is another reason why you want to get some hands-on time, some of these systems can turn better on a penny, others will have you cursing when you get to something tricky like a mildly tight corner!  Also check the sort of tyres they have, some can get punctures so it is worthwhile knowing how you can get spares.
Height – There seems to be a trend at the moment for people to have prams that seem to be barely above streetlevel while the parents are shoved back a mile or two!  Not good for backs and not good for parent-baby interaction.  See if you can adjust the height of the handle as well – some can move a lot which helps if mum and dad are significantly different heights.
Facing direction – While baby is lying down you want them facing you – this is when their attention is generally focused on you and they shouldn’t be deprived of that.  And when they are a little older you may want the option of which way they face.
——
In the end we managed to get a great deal on eBay for the iCandy Apple which should not only take us through for a good number of years with it’s different seat configurations, but it also has the option for an adaptor which turns it into a double buggy if our original plans of having a number of kids in quick succession becomes reality.
Happy Buggy Hunting!Choosing how you are going to push your little one around really must be up there with choosing a car in terms of choice and complexity!
copyright Scott Keddy (flickr)

copyright Scott Keddy (flickr)

There are so many aspects to keep in mind when choosing your “travel system” as many of these are now grandly described.

After so much time looking at the different options in stores, pushing them around, getting the salesperson to show me how they fold, etc. I feel I can give a few hints and tips about what to look out for when you are doing your own pram search.

——

Weight – You will be amazed at how heavy these things can be – they may look all sleek and light but that is generally only for the ones that are for older children that don’t need as much support.  I highly recommend that you get them and try to lift them yourself, you may be surprised.  Keep in mind that you then need to add the weight of a baby, and all of their additional paraphernalia!

Easy of Folding – Because of the complexity of these systems they also have equally complex ways of folding down.  And this is crucial both when you are at home collapsing it so that you can get into the rest of your house, but also if you need to fold them down when travelling (putting them in a boot, closing down for train or bus, etc.)

Length of use – The price of the system has to be balanced against how long it is going to be useful for – you can get some expensive systems that cost a fortune and aren’t useful when baby becomes a toddler.  And have a think about if you plan to have babies in quick succession – some buggies come with the ability to expand to hold two babies/toddlers.

Maneuverability – Again this is another reason why you want to get some hands-on time, some of these systems can turn better on a penny, others will have you cursing when you get to something tricky like a mildly tight corner!  Also check the sort of tyres they have, some can get punctures so it is worthwhile knowing how you can get spares.

Height – There seems to be a trend at the moment for people to have prams that seem to be barely above streetlevel while the parents are shoved back a mile or two!  Not good for backs and not good for parent-baby interaction.  See if you can adjust the height of the handle as well – some can move a lot which helps if mum and dad are significantly different heights.

Facing direction – While baby is lying down you want them facing you – this is when their attention is generally focused on you and they shouldn’t be deprived of that.  And when they are a little older you may want the option of which way they face.

——

In the end we managed to get a great deal on eBay for the iCandy Apple which should not only take us through for a good number of years with it’s different seat configurations, but it also has the option for an adaptor which turns it into a double buggy if our original plans of having a number of kids in quick succession becomes reality.

Happy Buggy Hunting!

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